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So you’ve been appointed as executor of a will – What next? The death of a loved family member or friend is invariably a difficult time, and without a properly implemented estate plan, it can become an unfortunate burden on the executor of the deceased person’s estate – once again reaffirming the importance of fulsome estate planning that can minimise distress at that unfortunate time.

So you know what probate is (and if you don’t, see our article “What is Probate” here). The next question usually is, "Do I need a grant of probate?"

At its most basic level, a grant of probate is simply a Supreme Court order, given to an executor, that identifies the executor as the person to deal with the deceased person’s estate.

The following summary sets out some of the relevant time frames and procedures any family provision applicant ought to be mindful of for Queensland matters.

state litigation enjoys a relatively unique status in litigation. In most court cases, it is relatively standard for the losing party to be ordered to pay the legal costs of the winning party.

Under Queensland’s Succession Act 1981, the mentioned categories of persons are eligible to contest the estate of a deceased person.

Contesting a will (also known as family provision or further provision applications) requires proof. Here's everything you need to know.

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